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Ferrocement Educational Forum  |  Other Discussions  |  Tools & Equipment  |  Topic: Ferrocement applicator « previous next »
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Marc de Piolenc
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« on: October 16, 2015, 04:05:58 PM »

Years ago while researching ferrocement, I found a diagram in a book of a ferrocement mortar applicator. It was basically a box open on one side, with the opposite side closed by a movable partition to which a vibrator was attached. The idea was, you filled the thing with mortar, then applied the open end to the mesh and ran the vibrator, which then helped you force mortar into the mesh.

I don't remember the name of the  book and I've never seen it since.
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Paul Sarnstrom
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« Reply #1 on: October 20, 2015, 11:23:03 AM »

Hello,

The box you describe is shown in a photograph in the FERRO-7 symposia. This was developed by Dr. Hugo Wainsthok Rivas, a doctor of Engineering and professor in Havana, Cuba. It is used in applying mortar to a vertical FC armature. Handles are provided so the box can be lifted and follow the vertical armature from bottom to top.

The box or hopper has 5 sides and an open top so it can be manually filled with mortar. The rear of the box, the side that faces towards the operator slants somewhat so a narrower end of the box is at the bottom. The front of the box, the section that faces away from the operator and towards the FC mesh armature has a rectangular, horizontal opening through which mortar flows out of the box/hopper and towards the armature. The vibrating end of a conventional, concrete vibrator is located horizontally and positioned towards the bottom of the box to aid in mortar flow and penetration. There is also a screed at the bottom of the box so the mortar is leveled as the box moves over the mesh armature.

There is a similar arrangement for the horizontal application of mortar.with the opening located directly at the bottom of the box rather than the bottom of a side of the box. In this application the hopper is moved horizontally and used in panel production. This application allows for some simple creative layout that enables a number of panel molds to be cast in one pass. The molds which are all the same dimension are laid out end-to-end in a straight line and located between two, simple rails. The hopper is started at the end of one of the panel molds and moved along the series of molds until the other end of the panel molds is reached. Mortar is added manually [shovels] to the hopper and a concrete vibrator and screed are included so as the hopper moves along the rails, the armatures that were previously placed in the molds are encapsulated with mortar. 

The motive power to move the hopper is supplied by a crankshaft and gearing from a bicycle. This is mounted on a stand and the crank pedal shafts are manually turned by an operator. A long, bicycle chain runs from the crank on one end to the other end of the panels and moves around an idler wheel. This chain is attached to the hopper so that as the operator turns the crank the hopper moves along the series of panel molds.

Paul

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Paul Sarnstrom
Marc de Piolenc
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« Reply #2 on: January 22, 2016, 01:05:57 AM »

Hello,

The box you describe is shown in a photograph in the FERRO-7 symposia. This was developed by Dr. Hugo Wainsthok Rivas, a doctor of Engineering and professor in Havana, Cuba. It is used in applying mortar to a vertical FC armature. Handles are provided so the box can be lifted and follow the vertical armature from bottom to top.

The box or hopper has 5 sides and an open top so it can be manually filled with mortar. The rear of the box, the side that faces towards the operator slants somewhat so a narrower end of the box is at the bottom. The front of the box, the section that faces away from the operator and towards the FC mesh armature has a rectangular, horizontal opening through which mortar flows out of the box/hopper and towards the armature. The vibrating end of a conventional, concrete vibrator is located horizontally and positioned towards the bottom of the box to aid in mortar flow and penetration. There is also a screed at the bottom of the box so the mortar is leveled as the box moves over the mesh armature.

There is a similar arrangement for the horizontal application of mortar.with the opening located directly at the bottom of the box rather than the bottom of a side of the box. In this application the hopper is moved horizontally and used in panel production. This application allows for some simple creative layout that enables a number of panel molds to be cast in one pass. The molds which are all the same dimension are laid out end-to-end in a straight line and located between two, simple rails. The hopper is started at the end of one of the panel molds and moved along the series of molds until the other end of the panel molds is reached. Mortar is added manually [shovels] to the hopper and a concrete vibrator and screed are included so as the hopper moves along the rails, the armatures that were previously placed in the molds are encapsulated with mortar. 

The motive power to move the hopper is supplied by a crankshaft and gearing from a bicycle. This is mounted on a stand and the crank pedal shafts are manually turned by an operator. A long, bicycle chain runs from the crank on one end to the other end of the panels and moves around an idler wheel. This chain is attached to the hopper so that as the operator turns the crank the hopper moves along the series of panel molds.

Paul



Is there any chance you could scan the diagram and description of that tool? I have no chance of finding those symposium proceedings...
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Paul Sarnstrom
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« Reply #3 on: January 24, 2016, 02:41:17 PM »

Hello Marc,

My scanner is down so no, I can't scan and post a photo of the box. I attempted to describe it in as much detail as possible. It's pretty simple really, one of those "why didn't I think of that?" clever ideas. If there is a part or parts of the description that I was not clear on let me know and I'll do my best to better define that part or parts.

Remember that this method is useful for applying mortar to multiple layers of mesh in a flat, vertically oriented, traditional FC armature, i.e. a wall. It would not be useful in the laminated or LFC method.

For horizontal application of mortar in traditional FC panels the subsequent method I described is useful. This is another, simple idea that eliminates some of the labor involved in traditional FC work.

Remember that in traditional FC the armature consists of multiple layers of mesh that have been tied together. The mortar must be pushed through all the layers of mesh in one application with the goal of 100% encapsulation of all mesh. At first the temptation is to use as much pressure as possible when applying the mortar however in practice problems arise. The more pressure that is applied to the mortar then the more the sand grains tend to pack together. The mortar becomes firmer and more difficult to press and squeeze through the mesh layers. A the mortar becomes stiffer the tendency is to apply even more pressure with the result that the problem worsens.

When applying mortar in traditional FC the use of lighter pressures, with appropriate levels of vibration will yield a higher percentage of mesh encapsulation than when higher pressures are used in mortar application.

LFC or laminated Ferrocement eliminates this issue entirely through the lamination process.

let me know if I can clear anything up,
Paul

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Paul Sarnstrom
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