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Ferrocement Educational Forum  |  Related Discussions  |  Natural Finishes  |  Topic: lime plaster, paints and washes « previous next »
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Chris Glasspool
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« Reply #15 on: September 23, 2009, 06:40:03 AM »

Hi Steve,
No, for several reasons. First I'm not there yet - I'm still working on these work sheds, not on actual projects. Second, it isn't just about cost, but these sealers are best for different situations; food counter, or 50 year UV durability - car showroom, or residential patio, or whatever your concern would be.

i know that the Silicate Sealers are used for grinding on countertops as they are food safe, and used where the dry look is needed - that is no epoxy cover, as in the ground down aggregate look. Recently Lithium Silicate is the new wonder child, but formally perhaps 100's of proprietary formulations of silicate chemistry have been used. Potassium silicate is another type.

Incidentally acid staining is not a sealer, and actually softens the surface, making the use of a sealer necessary. Now new stains are available that do not use a acid but mimic the look with more even results, and no haz-mat clean up. More than ever a new generation of dyes and stencils are available too.

As you look into this, be aware that things like silicates are also known as Surface Hardeners. Also available are dry color hardeners, which are broadcast by hand and then troweled or stamped in place.

Now you can plan your fc project for durability, matt - gloss, and color, stain or stenciled design. - chris

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Tacincala
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« Reply #16 on: April 26, 2010, 04:59:34 AM »

Can you help a clueless female with her DIY?
Well, just bought an end terrace house. Got lots of general upgrade to do but have no idea how to do it! I don't wanna cut corners and do bodge jobs but I can't afford to get contractors in either. I've had quote after quote after quote and each contractor has give me the cock and bull about this and that needing doing, costing thousands. I feel like they are taking advantage.
My porch roof is leaking into kitchen and I wanna sort it today before the 'MONTH LONG DOWN POUR!'
My guttering is leaking at back of house onto wall and window -worried about damp penetration (just had dpc done)
My guttering is leaking at the front splashing against cellar air brick.
I need to find some good lime wash to for my dampish cellar - can't find any in any hardware shops - online is too expensive
I've just levelled my garden out but can't seed it or landscape it as its water logged - what do you suggest?
I've had dpc done on internal wall with lime plaster, do I have to wait 6 mths to paint??
« Last Edit: April 26, 2010, 08:15:34 AM by Chris Glasspool » Logged
Chris Glasspool
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« Reply #17 on: April 26, 2010, 08:14:26 AM »

Tacincala,

Sounds like you are looking for a liquid can of lime wash. It is a powder in a sack (Type S). It can be purchased hardware stores that cater to masons. Do not buy agriculture lime used for amending soil or marking ball fields. Mix the lime with water, and let soack for twenty-four hours before using. The water level in the mixing bucket should be an inch or two over the top of the lime. It can be applied with a trowel or a paint brush, and is time consuming, as you want to build up very thin layers.
 
I can't answer the general repair questions without looking at the job.

Please leave off the spam tag lines at the end of your posts. Thanks, chris
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Chris Glasspool
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Posts: 498



« Reply #18 on: April 26, 2010, 09:11:54 AM »


Tacincala,

Ah yes, your question; "Do I have to wait 6 months to paint?" Lime plaster likes a damp surface to stick to, so if i understand the question then yes, go ahead. Also, Lime breathes allowing moisture to escape in every direction. Do not use acrylic when wanting it to breathe. Don't know what dpc is, so am hampered a bit in answering your question. Is it damp proofing concrete? If so, it should stick well to this. Lime is not like modern paints and stuccos, and may need more maintenance. I haven't used it on exterior projects for this reason.
- chris
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