Ferrocement Photo Gallery

Ferrocement Photos



Loren
1 album(s)
7 file(s)

Ted
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29 file(s)

mxsteve
2 album(s)
7 file(s)

ela
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doug
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steve
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6 file(s)

Magicraftsman
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Paul
3 album(s)
48 file(s)

jerohome
1 album(s)
19 file(s)

Bill&Julie
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marsha
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LanceCollins
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4 file(s)
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Random files - User galleries
IMG_0201.jpg
Welding the Rebar1743 viewsSince we are only using a papercrete stucco that has very little strength we need to actually weld all the rebar together. This process goes quite fast. Pictured here is Smoke with his little MIG welder.
FERR_HOUSE_01.jpg
711 views
ted10.jpg
Photo 10982 viewsI applied special heat tape to mask off the powder coated paint from covering areas to be in direct contact with the ferro cement. I pondered this decision. You want the cleanest, most direct contact between all metal and the cementitious material. This is for reasons of adhesion, and to not introduce materials with different expansion and contraction heat coefficients that would work the materials apart (cement and steel being beautifully similar). But in this situation we will have a metal frame that is not completely encapsulated by mortar, leaving a potential gray area (pardon the pun) open to the intrusion of wicking moisture up into the uncoated metal. The metal would then expand with rust, and crack the mortar eventually leading to disintegration of the structure's integrity. Solution? I masked so that paint areas would be covered about an inch with 100% Acryl 60 mixed mortar, a compromise strategy. This situation is downward facing, and would be sheltered deeply under each tread. I also later shaped the mortar so condensate is encouraged to fall from the cement before running down onto the painted metal plate surfaces. I would never risk this design in a wet geographical climate because of wicking upward potential. Also, just prior to mortaring I sprayed a coat of rust converter onto this 'gray area' to stabilize any metal oxides present. What else for a potential Achilles heel? If this becomes a problem down the road, we'll all be gone to 'ferro cement heaven' and the house itself will be remodeled. I give this FC/steel interface area of the project 100 years before trouble, and the vacillatudes of fashion will do this work in faster than any other force on the planet.
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Solar House, exterior View1236 views
corner slope.jpg
Strong Corner2349 viewsThese shorter stretches of wall needed no exterior supports because of the supporting corner and short spans of straight wall.
lovag05.jpg
2541 views
bubble.jpg
2397 viewsa little part of technique a little siesta's bubble with a nice view on the trees
Photo-106.jpg
2402 views

Last additions - User galleries
inside_cutout.jpg
1308 viewsAfter bolting and welding the roofs from outside, I begin to cut doorways.Aug 27, 2011
Seat_5.jpg
1208 viewsAug 15, 2011
Seat_6.jpg
1160 viewsAug 15, 2011
Seat_8.jpg
1139 viewsAug 15, 2011
Seat_9.jpg
1394 viewsAug 15, 2011
Seat_14.jpg
1225 viewsAug 15, 2011
Seat.jpg
1158 viewsAug 15, 2011
Seat_1.jpg
957 viewsAug 15, 2011